Special Projects

Special Projects

This section is dedicated to special curatorial projects and newly commissioned artworks

Time Out of Joint

Time Out of Joint is a special online exhibition curated by Eva & Franco Mattes for the Yerevan Biennal. It takes place on the Darknet, a remote location at the ‘periphery’ of the internet where time operates at a slow pace and pages load unhurriedly. New works by six artists will be added once every two weeks, from October 2020 to January 2021, and in ‘peer-to-peer’ style they are available to be seen, copied and reused... The title for this show was borrowed from a novel by Philip K. Dick.

With new works by Joshua Citarella, Clusterduck, David Horvitz, Vladan Joler, Amalia Ulman and 2050+
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Reality in Change

Reality is a most elusive concept. The reality, which is about to change or has only just changed, is even harder to decipher. So how can we approach it? How can we capture, archive or document change through the lens of art?

The five Armenian artists included in this exhibition, have personally witnessed the process of sociopolitical change known as the ‘Armenian Velvet Revolution’ (2018). Through their work they portray their personal experiences of the wavering reality that followed this bloodless revolution. The exhibition brings together their viewpoints.
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The Aslamazyan Sisters

The exhibition "The Aslamazyan Sisters" is devoted to the artistic legacy of two remarkable Armenian sisters and artists, whose life and artistic trajectory span the entire history of the USSR. Through their modernist approach and prolific international careers, Mariam and Eranuhi Aslamazyan broke conventions in the male-dominated Soviet visual art world and challenged the patriarchal society of Soviet Armenia.
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Angels of Protection

The exhibition "Angels of Protection" is dedicated to the Armenian ceramic school of Kutahya, which flourished from the 16th to the early 20thcenturies – a historic period during which consumer culture and global trade were increasingly developing. Armenian potters of Kutahya produced a wide range of wares for domestic use and objects crafted for places of worship.
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